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Buy Eticyclidine for sale online from USA vendor

Specification
Product Name: Eticyclidine
IUPAC Name: (1-Phenylcyclohexyl)ethylamine
Other Names: PCE, Eticyclidine
Molecular Formula: None
Molar Mass: 237.26 g·mol−1
Effect: stimulant, psychedelic
Purity of the substance: 99.9%
Physical properties: Crystals, Powder
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  • Eticyclidine for sale online from USA vendor

Table of Contents

  1. Introduction
  2. Chemistry of PCE (Eticyclidine)
  3. Pharmacology of PCE
  4. Subjective Effects of PCE
  5. Dosage of PCE
  6. Toxicity and Harm Potential of PCE
  7. Dangerous Interactions
  8. Legal Status of PCE

Overview of PCE (Eticyclidine or CI-400)

Introduction

PCE, also known as Eticyclidine or CI-400, belongs to the arylcyclohexylamine chemical class. It exhibits dissociative, anesthetic, and hallucinogenic effects upon administration. Its mechanism of action primarily involves acting as an NMDA receptor antagonist, akin to its structural analog PCP. PCE binds noncompetitively to the NMDA receptor, thereby blocking its activity.

Historical Context

PCP was initially introduced as an anesthetic pharmaceutical drug in the 1950s but was withdrawn from the market in 1965 due to its high incidence of dissociative hallucinogenic side effects, a trait also observed in PCE. Subsequently, ketamine emerged as a more well-tolerated derivative for pharmaceutical anesthesia. Post this development, several synthetic derivatives of PCP have been commercialized as dissociative drugs for recreational and non-medical purposes.

Current Usage and Characteristics of PCE

Recreational Usage

In contemporary times, PCE is predominantly utilized as a recreational drug, occasionally for entheogenic purposes, alongside its popular counterparts like 3-MeO-PCP and 3-MeO-PCE. The drug can be ingested orally, smoked, insufflated, or injected.

Characteristics

PCE is renowned for its potency, diverse effects, prolonged duration of action, and potential for abuse. While sharing similar effects with PCP, PCE is marginally more potent. However, its unpalatable taste and tendency to induce nausea have contributed to its relatively obscure status among users.

Chemistry of PCE (Eticyclidine)

Molecular Structure

PCE, also known as Eticyclidine, is classified as a synthetic dissociative within the arylcyclohexylamine class. Its molecular structure consists of a cyclohexane, a saturated six-membered ring, bonded to another ring and an -ethyl group at R1. One of these rings is a piperidine ring, a nitrogenous six-membered ring bonded at its nitrogen group. Unlike PCP, where the nitrogen group is attached to a full cyclohexane ring, in PCE, it is bonded to an ethyl group. The name "PCE" is derived from the initial letters of the three constituent rings: phenyl, cyclohexane, and ethyl.

Pharmacology of PCE

Mechanism of Action

PCE primarily acts as an NMDA receptor antagonist. NMDA receptors, a subtype of glutamate receptors, facilitate the transmission of electrical signals between nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord. For these signals to pass, the receptor must be open. By blocking NMDA receptors, PCE disrupts this signaling, leading to effects such as anesthesia, motor discoordination, and a state often described as a "hole," reminiscent of experiences induced by ketamine but qualitatively distinct.

Additional Pharmacological Effects

In addition to its NMDA receptor blocking properties, PCE also functions as a dopamine-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor and a serotonin reuptake inhibitor. Moreover, it is suspected to possess µ-opioid affinity. These actions contribute to its euphoric and stimulating effects.

Comparative Potency and Effects

PCE exhibits slightly greater potency compared to PCP and shares similar effects. However, its unappealing taste and tendency to induce nausea have resulted in its lower acceptance among users.

Subjective Effects of PCE

Introduction and Disclaimer

The following effects are based on anecdotal user reports and the Subjective Effect Index (SEI). Readers should approach these effects with skepticism as they may not occur predictably or reliably. Higher doses are more likely to induce a broader spectrum of effects, including adverse reactions such as addiction, severe injury, or even death.

Physical Effects

  • Spontaneous physical sensations
  • Tactile suppression
  • Loss of physical autonomy
  • Impaired motor control
  • Physical euphoria
  • Perception of bodily lightness
  • Dizziness
  • Nausea

Disconnective Effects

  • Tactile disconnection
  • Visual disconnection: This can lead to experiences akin to the "k-hole," including perceptions of holes, spaces, voids, and altered structures. Unlike ketamine, PCE does not immobilize users at this level, potentially resulting in unpredictable psychotic behavior.
  • Consciousness disconnection

Visual Effects

  • Visual suppression
  • Suppressed visual acuity
  • Double vision
  • Suppressed pattern recognition
  • Suppressed frame rate
  • Visual distortions
  • Perspective distortions
  • Environmental cubism
  • Environmental orbism
  • Scenery slicing
  • Geometric patterns
  • Hallucinatory states, including external and internal hallucinations

Cognitive Effects

  • Stimulating, euphoric, and clear-headed headspace compared to DXM and ketamine
  • Anxiety suppression
  • Disinhibition
  • Conceptual thinking
  • Thought acceleration
  • Thought disorganization
  • Immersion enhancement
  • Delusion
  • Depersonalization and derealization
  • Memory suppression
  • Ego death
  • Amnesia
  • Suppressed analysis
  • Time distortion
  • Cognitive euphoria
  • Introspection
  • Déjà vu
  • Compulsive redosing
  • Feelings of impending doom
  • Enhancement of creativity
  • Psychosis: This effect is more common with PCE compared to other dissociatives.

Auditory Effects

  • Suppressed auditory perception
  • Auditory distortions
  • Auditory hallucinations

Experience Reports

There are currently no anecdotal reports describing the effects of PCE within our experience index. Additional experience reports may be found on platforms like Erowid Experience Vaults.

Dosage of PCE

Threshold

  • 1 mg

Light

  • 3 - 5 mg

Common

  • 5 - 10 mg

Strong

  • 10 - 15 mg

Heavy

  • 15 mg and above

Note on Heavy Doses

Heavy doses exceeding 15 mg may induce psychosis and mania.

Toxicity and Harm Potential of PCE

Long-Term Effects

  • Long-term use of PCE may lead to schizophrenia-like psychotic episodes, severe and lasting memory loss, disorganized thinking, depression, weight loss, liver abnormalities, and rhabdomyolysis (skeletal muscle breakdown).
  • Some studies on rats have indicated that PCE, like other NMDA receptor antagonists, may cause brain damage known as Olney's lesions.
  • PCE has been shown to induce schizophrenia-like changes in N-acetylaspartate and N-acetylaspartylglutamate levels in the rat brain, which are detectable both in living rats and upon necropsy examination of brain tissue.

Tolerance and Addiction Potential

  • Chronic use of PCE can lead to addiction with a high potential for adverse side effects, including psychosis.
  • Tolerance to PCE develops with prolonged and repeated use, necessitating larger doses to achieve the same effects.
  • PCE exhibits cross-tolerance with all dissociatives, meaning that after consumption, the effects of other dissociatives will be diminished.
  • PCE is reported to cause psychosis and mania at a significantly higher rate than other dissociatives.

Harm Reduction Practices

  • Extreme caution and harm reduction practices should be exercised when using PCE.
  • Users should avoid consecutive daily use and carefully monitor and limit their consumption to mitigate adverse effects.
  • Recommended dosage ranges should not be exceeded to avoid triggering adverse effects.
  • Users should start with low doses and gradually increase, preferably using volumetric liquid dosing due to the drug's potency.
  • Compulsive redosing before fully sobering up is not recommended.
  • Combining PCE with other substances, especially stimulants, psychedelics, or other dissociatives, is strongly discouraged due to the risk of psychosis.

Urinary Tract Effects

  • PCE may cause extreme bladder and urinary tract problems, similar to other arylcyclohexylamines like ketamine or PCP. Symptoms may include urinary frequency, urgency, pressure, pelvic and bladder pain, hematuria, and incontinence.

Dangerous Interactions

  • Combining PCE with other psychoactive substances, especially psychedelics, stimulants, or depressants, can result in extreme psychological disturbances, respiratory depression, and increased risk of suffocation.

Legal Status

  • Internationally, PCE is classified as a Schedule I substance under the Convention on Psychotropic Substances.
  • Its legality varies by country, with many nations regulating or prohibiting its sale, possession, and use without a license or prescription. For example, in the United States, PCE is classified as a Schedule II controlled substance.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) about PCE

Q: What is PCE?

A: PCE, also known as Eticyclidine or CI-400, is a synthetic dissociative substance belonging to the arylcyclohexylamine chemical class. It produces dissociative, anesthetic, and hallucinogenic effects when administered.

Q: How does PCE work?

A: PCE primarily acts as an NMDA receptor antagonist, disrupting signaling between nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord. It also functions as a dopamine-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor and a serotonin reuptake inhibitor, contributing to its euphoric and stimulating effects.

Q: What are the common effects of PCE?

A: Common effects of PCE include physical sensations, dissociative effects, visual distortions, cognitive effects, and auditory distortions. These effects can vary in intensity depending on the dosage and individual response.

Q: What are the recommended dosages for PCE?

A: The dosage of PCE varies depending on the desired effect:

  • Threshold: 1 mg
  • Light: 3 - 5 mg
  • Common: 5 - 10 mg
  • Strong: 10 - 15 mg
  • Heavy: 15 mg and above

Q: Is PCE addictive?

A: Yes, chronic use of PCE can lead to addiction with a high potential for adverse side effects, including psychosis. Tolerance to PCE develops with prolonged and repeated use, necessitating larger doses to achieve the same effects.

Q: What are the potential dangers of using PCE?

A: Long-term use of PCE may lead to schizophrenia-like psychotic episodes, memory loss, disorganized thinking, depression, and other adverse effects. Additionally, combining PCE with other psychoactive substances can result in extreme psychological disturbances and respiratory depression.

Q: What is the legal status of PCE?

A: PCE is classified as a Schedule I substance under the Convention on Psychotropic Substances internationally. Its legality varies by country, with many nations regulating or prohibiting its sale, possession, and use without a license or prescription.

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